There’s a story behind this shirt

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There’s a story behind this shirt – 100 years ago, in September 1915, Dundee’s local army regiment The Black Watch suffered their cruellest day at the Battle of Loos – 57% of their soldiers who took part were killed, something that hit the city and surrounding areas badly where nearly everyone was affected by the loss of a relative or friend. Dundee would wear this kit against Ross County on 26th September the nearest match to the anniversary of the battle to salute the memory of ‘Dundee’s own’.

We photographed the launch photos in the home dressing room at Dens Park, with 19 year old Calvin Colquhoun modelling the kit, we also had Lewis Mitchell, the youngest of the Black Watch soldiers present in the main picture.

I was glad that they used young lads as many of those killed at Loos would have been of similar age or younger. My grandad, David Wilson, was in the Black Watch during the Great War though luckily he was too young to have been at Loos – he joined up in 1916 aged 17, like many of that generation he never spoke of the things he saw in action.

Football kits are like Marmite – they split the public down the middle, and Dundee’s latest strip certainly did that – but for all the many online comments from people who hated it – it’s turned out to be one of the fastest selling kits in the club’s history and the club have made a donation from each shirt to The Black Watch Association totalling over £3000.

Tech stuff: This picture was shot with my Canon 1dx and  50mm f1.2L lens (probably my favourite combination for people photos) in manual mode –  ISO 200, 160th second shutter speed and lens at f6.3. It was lit with two Yongnuo YN568EX II flashes in manual mode (1/4 power) bounced off umbrellas either side of the subjects) – Flashes were fired using Yongnuo YN-622C radio triggers controlled by Yongnuo YN-622C-TX Wireless Flash Controller mounted on hotshot of 1dx.

A week later, on the Thursday before the Ross County match, Greg Stewart and Paul McGinn spoke to the press to preview the game and I took pictures of them on the Dens pitch.

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Tech stuff: This picture was shot with my Canon 1dx and 17-40 f4L lens (in manual mode – ISO 200, 250th second shutter speed and lens at f11). Lit with one Yongnuo YN568EX II flash, no modifier and flash four or five feet to my right – Flash was fired using Yongnuo YN-622C radio trigger controlled by Yongnuo YN-622C-TX Wireless Flash Controller mounted on hotshot of 1dx, this time the flash was in ETTL mode.

Onto the day of the match and it looked as if the ocassion would fall flat for Dundee, they trailed County 3-1 as The Black Watch pipes and drums took to the field at half time – Ron Scott wrote in The Sunday Post next day ‘Black Watch pipes inspire Dundee’s fightback’ and he’s got a point – Dundee returned to the field just as the band were exiting the arena and the applause the team got was certainly louder than I’d have expected at 3-1 down and it seemed that the band had given the crowd a lift.

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Tech stuff: Canon 1dx with 70-200 f2.8L lens at 150mm, ISO 640, shutter priority mode 1/1250 sec exposure at f2.8 and +0.3 exposure compensation.

And Dundee fought back for a point, that could have been three, in a match which to use a cliche was a cracker for any neutral watchers.

Here’s Rory Loy slotting away the penalty which started the comeback.

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Tech stuff: Canon 1dx with 70-200 f2.8L lens at 98mm, ISO 400, shutter priority mode 1/1250 sec exposure at f2.8 and +0.3 exposure compensation.

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